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Nov 26 2013

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PORN VALLEY ALERT: New STD PLAGUE Worse Than AIDS Just Hit Los Angeles Porn – SUPER Gonorrhea

2 New Gonorrhea Cases…In Porn This Time It’s Antibiotic Resistant

Both were given another round of antibiotics, and both insisted that they were not having contact with anybody, and still coming up positive.

Both cases have been reported to the CDC. Between the two of them they had contact with 12 females, and 4 male performers, and an unknown number of private contacts. The industry should declare a moratorium until ALL performers are tested.

super std gonorrhea

May 1, 2013 – Monica Foster commentary:

Countless (and nameless Johns) nationwide need to take Isadore Hall’s advice and throw on a rubber before indulging in a night of debauchery with their favorite pornstar escort…not just due to the risk of contracting HIV, but due to the risk of the NEW SUPER SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASE SUPER GONORRHEA As of late I’ve noticed several pornstars tweeting that they are very sick (and some are being hospitalized). If the trend continues I will make a list.

article spotted on AdultFYI.com  from www.cnbc.com – An antibiotic-resistant strain of gonorrhea—now considered a superbug—has some analysts saying that the bacteria’s effects could match those of AIDS. “This might be a lot worse than AIDS in the short run because the bacteria is more aggressive and will affect more people quickly,” said Alan Christianson, a doctor of naturopathic medicine.

“Getting gonorrhea from this strain might put someone into septic shock and death in a matter of days,” Christianson said. “This is very dangerous.” “It’s an emergency situation,” said William Smith, executive director of the National Coalition of STD Directors. “As time moves on, it’s getting more and more dangerous.” This gonorrhea strain, HO41, was discovered in Japan two years ago in a 31-year-old female sex worker who had been screened in 2009. The bacteria has since been found in Hawaii, California and Norway.

Because it resists current antibiotic treatment, the strain has been placed in the superbug category with other resistant bacteria, such as MRSA and CRE. These superbugs kill about half the people they attack, and nearly one in 20 hospital patients become infected with one, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Though no deaths from HO41 have been reported, efforts to combat it must continue, Smith argued. “We have to keep beating the drum on this,” he said. “The potential for disaster is great.”

According to the CDC, about 20,000,000 people a year contract a sexually transmitted disease (STD) and result in about $16 billion in medical costs. More than 800,000 of STD cases reported are gonorrhea infections, with most occurring in people between the ages of 15 and 24. Gonorrhea is transmitted through unprotected sexual contact. Untreated, the disease can cause a number of health complications in women, including infertility.

In men, the disease can be very painful and lead to sterility. It can also trigger other life-threatening illnesses, including heart infections. Gonorrhea can be hard to detect. It often shows no symptoms in about half of women and in about 5 percent of men. Gonorrhea infection rates were at historic lows until two years ago, according to the CDC. “That’s what’s kind of scary about this,” Smith said. “We are at lows in terms of infections, but this strain is a very tricky bug and we don’t have anything medically to fight it right now.”

Since 1998, the Federal Drug Administration has approved only four new antibiotics of any kind, according to the Infectious Disease Society of America. The last approval was in 2010. Only seven antibiotics are in an advanced stage of development—still years away from approval and use.

Recognizing the problem, Congress passed a law last year referred to as the Gain Act (Generating Antibiotics Incentives Now) to help speed antibiotic development. But Smith said more needs to be done. In a briefing on Capital Hill last week, he urged Congress to target nearly $54 million in immediate funding to help find an antibiotic for HO41 and to conduct an education and public awareness campaign. “I’m hopeful we’ll get the additional funds, but I can’t say for sure,” Smith said. “What I do know is we don’t have the resources to fight this as it stands now.” Avoiding the disease completely is the best course, experts said.

“People need to practice safe sex, like always,” Christianson said. “Anyone beginning a new relationship should get tested along with their partner. The way gonorrhea works, not everyone knows they have it. And with this new strain it’s even more important than ever to find out. “ All superbugs must be dealt with before it’s too late, he said. “This is a disaster just waiting to happen,” Christianson said. “It’s time to do something about it before it explodes. “These superbugs, including the gonorrhea strain, are a health threat. We need to move now before it gets out of hand.”

POSTED ON FOXX MEDIA GROUP APRIL 5, 2013

 

CRISIS: Mutating Gonorrhea and ‘Superbugs’ Coming Soon to a Town Near You? Kills About Half the People They Attack

EDITORIAL: I reported on the Super Gonorrhea over a year ago because we saw it spreading around the country and the World where Porn Valley pornstars are trafficked to meet their johns. There’s also Hep C running rampant because the CDC doesn’t have it listed under STDs yet it is transmitted through blood the same as HIV so IS definitely an STD. Why are we just now hearing about the ‘Superbug’ crisis from CDC when ‘Super Gonorrhea’ has been traveling internationally and being sexually transmitted through prostitution of Porn Valley pornstars?

Our government, with full knowledge, allows these pornstars and their pimp agent/producers to cross our borders and yours everyday, where they go to have unprotected sex with johns who take their diseases home to their families! ICE: Stop leaving our borders open for these sex traffickers to come and go as they please. You know who they are, you know where they go and you know what they do.

Stop helping to spread their diseases all over the World. It’s illegal to cross borders and state lines to have sex for money so why aren’t President Obama and ICE stopping these sex traffickers from prostituting girls AND guys all over the World to spread death by sex??

April 1, 2013 at 12:28 PM EDT

PBS Newshour – By: Jason Kane

This World War II advertisement informs the soldiers about a new “wonder drug” that can cure gonorrhea. The disease is one of many diseases — including the infamous “superbugs” — now showing resistance to all modern medicines. Photo courtesy of the National Library of Medicine. Here are three good reasons the nickname “superbug” doesn’t cut it anymore for the drug-resistant crop of bacteria showing up in U.S. hospitals under the more formal title Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae:

  • They kill about half the people they attack
  • They’ve appeared in at least 42 states
  • And their resistance to drugs has quadrupled in the last decade or so

That’s why Dr. Tom Frieden — director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — came up with another name: “Nightmare bacteria.” Pretty startling language from the head of the CDC. But Frieden told reporters recently that the hype is justified. “Our strongest antibiotics don’t work and patients are left with potentially untreatable infections,” he said. Before panicking, here’s a caution: these germs aren’t very common.

For the moment, they’re confined mostly to inpatient health care facilities. And while the exact scope of the problem isn’t known — largely because medical facilities in most states aren’t required to track and report the number of CRE infections and deaths — the CDC estimates that only 4 percent of U.S. hospitals and 18 percent of long-term acute care centers had a patient with CRE in the first half of 2012. That’s why Frieden stressed that if the proper steps are taken, “we now have a window of opportunity to prevent its further spread.”

The same is true for a number of other germs that seem to be growing more indestructible against modern medicine by the year. A drug-resistant form of gonorrhea reached North America earlier this year and a “virtually untreatable” type of tuberculosis is currently spreading in some parts of the world. If nothing is done, CDC officials warn that a “post-antibiotic era” may be around the corner — an era in which diseases commonly cured today with a few pills could once again run rampant. And it may be closer than most people realize.

“It’s not something that’s theoretical,” said Dr. Arjun Srinivasan, associate Director for Healthcare Associated Infection Prevention Programs at the CDC. “It’s not a statement that someday, we might encounter bacteria that are resistant to all antibiotics. That day is here. And it really calls upon us to take action now.” Srinivasan joined PBS NewsHour last week to discuss the CDC’s latest findings on antibiotic-resistant infections — including gonorrhea and tuberculosis — and what Americans should be doing to protect themselves.

Dr. Srinivasan, thank you so much for joining us. Let’s cut right to the chase: How concerned should Americans be? Is this a crisis in the making? Dr. Srinivasan: I think crisis is probably not too strong a word for it. A number of factors add up here. Antibiotic resistance writ large is a huge and global issue. It is a challenge in America. It’s a challenge in every country in the world — in both our health care facilities and also out in the community. We are reaching a situation where we are running out of effective antibiotics to treat a host of different infections. We talk about resistance in malaria, in tuberculosis, in gonorrhea, in Methicillin-resistant Staph aureus, or MRSA, and most recently in these Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. So it’s really a far-reaching and global problem. And it’s something that is going to impact many, many people all over the world.

Dr. Frieden called this a ‘nightmare’ for public health. How, specifically, is that the case? Dr. Srinivasan: It is absolutely a nightmare scenario. The prospect of having bacterial infections that we can’t treat with antibiotics is indeed a nightmare. It has the potential to undo so much of the progress that we’ve made in medicine. A lot of the medical advances that we enjoy today are directly dependent on our ability to treat infections that patients might develop. For example, organ transplants, cancer chemotherapy, bone marrow transplants and a host of the other treatments that we give people for rheumatoid arthritis — all of these treatments have the undesirable effect of weakening a patient’s immune system, which means that all of them put patients at high risk for infection. We can offer people these treatments because we can treat infections, for the most part, that the patient is likely to develop as a result. So if we lose the ability to effectively treat those infections, we will lose the ability to safely offer people many of the modern medical advantages and advances that we take for granted every day.

What’s happening to make these bacteria resistant to the antibiotics we use? Srinivasan: Bacteria always develop resistance to antibiotics. They’ve been doing that since the dawn of time. And that’s because they have numbers on their sides. There are trillions of them. And over time, with exposure to antibiotics — and sometimes even without exposure to antibiotics — they will randomly develop mutations that might confer resistance to the antibiotics that we use. And so this is something that we know is going to happen and can never stop. So you will always have a need to have new antibiotics, because we know that bacteria eventually are going to develop resistance. But some of the other factors that are promoting this problem are the ability of these bacteria to spread, particularly within health care settings. So you might have one patient who has a resistant infection. But if we don’t do a good job of controlling infections within our hospitals and nursing homes and clinics, those bacteria can spread to other patients. And another contributing factor is, of course, the overuse of antibiotics that we see in the United States and indeed around the world. If you look at studies that have been done, they show you that across the board, in hospitals and nursing homes and outpatient clinics, up to half of all the antibiotics that we use are either not needed at all or we’re using them incorrectly. So there’s a tremendous overuse of antibiotics that’s also fueling this antibiotic resistance.

Which resistant infection is the CDC most worried about at the moment? Srinivasan: We’re worried about all of them. The one that we are really sounding the alarms about is Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, or CRE, and one of the reasons that we’re so particularly concerned about this one is that it really is that nightmare scenario where there are very limited treatment options and for some of them, there are, in fact, no treatment options. So this CRE really does take us into the post-antibiotic era. It’s not something that’s theoretical. It’s not a statement that some day, we might encounter bacteria that are resistant to all antibiotics. That day is here. We are encountering infections with these CRE that are resistant to all antibiotics. And it really calls upon us to take action now.

What’s the risk that someone who contracts CRE will die? Sreenivasan: It depends on a number of different factors, including which type of infection and a lot of issues with the type of patient. For example, studies in this country and in others have shown that nearly half of patients who get a bloodstream infection with the CRE will die.

These CRE “superbugs” you’ve mentioned are contracted mostly by sick people in the hospital. But infections like antibiotic resistant gonorrhea seem like they could spread far more easily in the general population — should people be more concerned? Sreenivasan: Antibiotic resistant gonorrhea is a major concern and it is indeed not one confined to health care facilities. It’s out in the community. And it can be spread fairly readily. The challenge that we face is that we are running out of the first-line treatment options that we like to use. And in particular, we’re running out of many of the oral treatment options that we have been able to use. Which means that as we run out of those oral agents, people might need intravenous therapy for treatment of simple gonorrhea infections that in the past could have been treated with an oral antibiotic. This is now being seen in the United States.

Let’s look at another disease Americans don’t typically worry about these days, at least not within U.S. borders: tuberculosis. There’s a strain circulating now that’s “extensively resistant” to all drugs. How concerned is the CDC about that? Could this become a major problem for the U.S. again? Sreenivasan: That’s another major concern. It’s certainly something that is more of an issue in other countries than it is the United States, but we really believe that resistance anywhere is resistance everywhere. A pathogen that’s drug-resistant in any country anywhere in the world is a short plane ride away from being here in the United States. And the challenge with tuberculosis is that it’s very transmissible. And so if you do begin to develop cases, there’s a high potential that those cases can spread to other people. So it’s one that we are working on closely with folks in other countries to better understand and figure out ways to control that.

You used a term earlier that many health officials are using with great urgency at the moment — “post-antibiotic era.” What exactly does that mean? And what repercussions could that have for patients? Srinivasan: We use that term post-antibiotic era to compare what could be coming to the pre-antibiotic era. There was a time in medicine when we didn’t have antibiotics — and a lot of people sometimes forget that that time wasn’t that long ago. Antibiotics really came onto the medical scene in the 1940s and 50s. Before that, when patients developed infections, they either healed themselves or they didn’t and there’s not much we can do to influence that outcome. And then we entered the era of having antibiotics and all of a sudden, the mortalities from infections plummeted. We were able to effectively treat the vast, vast majority of common infections that people develop. When we talk about the post-antibiotic era, we’re talking about a time that basically takes us back into time. Back to a time when people developed infections and we as clinicians could do nothing but stand by the bedside and hope that the patient would be able to fight the infection themselves because we had nothing to offer them in terms of treatment. It has major implications for our ability to practice medicine.

All of this begs the question: How much research is being done into new types of antibiotics? Srinivasan: There is research being done into new antibiotics. I think a lot more research needs to be done and this is a case where no one group should be working independently to lead that development. This is a case where academic partners, the government, drug companies — all of these groups should be working effectively together. Developing antibiotics is a very difficult prospect. A lot of people who are very knowledgeable about antibiotic development have said that the “easy” — not that any of them are easy — but the easier antibiotics have all been developed. The new antibiotics that we need to develop are going to be much more challenging than the ones we developed in the past. And so it’s going to take a coordinated and concerted effort on behalf of a variety of different experts in these areas to develop new antibiotics and bring them to our patients.

That being the case, how long will these new antibiotics take to hit the market? Srinivasan: My understanding is that the antibiotics in the works will take a while to develop. I think there are a few agents that are farther along than others. But I think that most experts in this field would agree that it’s likely to be many years before we have a new antibiotic to treat some of these infections. And particularly what they’re usually referring to is completely new antibiotics. Not simply a variation on a current theme but a truly new antibiotic that’s going to be effective against some of these very resistant pathogens we’re seeing today, like CRE.

So what preventive measures is the CDC currently pursuing to stop potential upcoming deaths? Srinivasan: Our preventive strategies with effect to antibiotic resistance really fall into three broad categories. One is monitoring and tracking. It’s important that we better understand where these resistant bacteria are, who is likely to get these infections with resistant bacteria and what factors might be driving that resistance. And to accomplish that, the CDC is very engaged in what we call ‘surveillance’ or ‘monitoring’ of these resistant infections. The other area where CDC is very focused is in trying to prevent the spread of these infections, particularly within our health care facilities. It’s a concept we call ‘infection control.’ And CDC develops guidelines and recommendations for how health care facilities can safely care for patients and minimize the risks of these types of resistant bacteria spreading within our hospitals, our nursing homes and our clinics. And the last area where CDC is very focused is trying to work with partners and work with clinicians to figure out how we can improve the use of antibiotics so that we can slow the development of antibiotic resistance.

One way to do that is to slow down the use of antibiotics. Patients are often told not to overuse them. Is that more of a precaution for keeping individual resistance to antibiotics in control — or is it mostly helpful for the population as a whole, in terms of staving off the development of these resistant microorganisms in the first place? Srinivasan: It’s really both. What we found is that when a patient takes an antibiotic that they don’t need, they are exposed to the side effects of the antibiotic without getting any benefit from it. Antibiotics have potential side effects, including allergic reactions and severe diarrhea in some cases. If you don’t need an antibiotic, you’re taking a medicine that has risks and you’re accruing no benefit from it. There was also a study recently that showed that if you take a course of antibiotics, you are significantly more likely down the road to develop an infection with a drug resistant bacteria. And of course there are the societal issues, as well. We know that the overuse of antibiotics helps breed resistant bacteria more quickly, which can be spread among other patients. So improving the use of antibiotics will not only have benefits to society but important benefits to individual patients.

Interesting information to consider. Dr. Srinivasan, thank you so much for being with us. Srinivasan: Thank you for having me.

 

POSTED ON PORN IN THE VALLEY JANUARY 13, 2012

Super Gonorrhea: Scientists Discover Antibiotic-Resistant STD – How Does Porn Valley Protect the Workers Against This Without Condoms??

EDITORIAL: Now, you know these girls have been traveling all over the World escorting AND YOU THINK THEY HAVEN’T BROUGHT ANY OF IT BACK HERE?? You cannot protect workers against this UNLESS YOU WEAR A CONDOM!! Porn Valley better start enforcing the condom law. It’s criminal negligence and liability for ANYONE getting sick because Porn Valley knows THE RISK!!

This has been kept very hush, hush in Porn Valley. There’s one article last year and it’s blown off as being overseas only. Ummm, again, Porn Valley sends these pornstars EVERYWHERE IN THE WORLD!! It’s already reached California and Hawaii. If you look at where the disease has traveled, you will see the path of the Pornstars go to the same places!! You still think it’s glamorous to have sex with a Pornstar?? Check this out, then we’ll talk!!supergonnorhea2

Super Gonorrhea: Scientists Discover Antibiotic-Resistant STD – How Does Porn Valley Protect the Workers Against This Without Condoms??

by Kiera Aaron
July 14, 2011, 05:09 am EST

Finding out you have chlamydia or gonorrhea—though inconvenient and stressful—isn’t the worst thing that can happen. After some antibiotics, you’re back in the game, right? Not necessarily: Researchers recently discovered a new strain of gonorrhea, H014, that can’t be killed with current antibiotics.

But it’s not the first super-strain. “Gonorrhea has a well known history of resisting antibiotics,” says Barbara Jean Van Der Pol, Ph.D., professor at Indiana University, and board member of the International Society for Sexually Transmitted Diseases Research. “Sixty percent of samples were resistant to penicillin within 50 years of being introduced to the drug.” Gonorrhea is a very complex bacterium with an amazing ability to mutate and resist antibiotics, the CDC says.

In fact, H014 has developed a resistance to all antibiotics, including cephalosporin, the last line of defense. “New antibiotics are desperately needed,” says Van Der Pol.

Should you be worried? Well, considering that gonorrhea—the second most common STD in the U.S.—can cause infertility in men, increase your risk of contracting HIV, and spread to your blood and joints, leading to death . . . yes.But on the other hand, not much has changed—if you wear condoms. The super-strain may be strong, but it can’t claw through latex.

Just make sure to wear it right: 94 percent of men make a rubber-related error before the act. Let out the air in the tip, which reduces the pressure on the latex, decreasing the chance of breakage—one of our five must-follow condom tips in Your Condom Is On Wrong

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Scientists have discovered a new strain of gonorrhea-causing bacteria in Japan that is resistant to available treatments.

Since the 1940s, the sexually transmitted disease known as “the clap” has been easily treated with >antibiotics. But the new strain of Neisseria gonorrhoeae has genetically mutated to evade cephalosporins — the only antibiotics still effective against the infection.

“This is both an alarming and a predictable discovery,” lead researcher Magnus Unemo, professor at the Swedish Reference Laboratory for Pathogenic Neisseria in Örebro, Sweden, said in a statement. “Since antibiotics became the standard treatment for gonorrhea in the 1940s, this bacterium has shown a remarkable capacity to develop resistance mechanisms to all drugs introduced to control it.”

>The discovery, announced by Unemo at the International Society for Sexually Transmitted Disease Research meeting in Quebec City, Canada, could hail gonorrhea’s transition from treatable STD to global public health threat.

“While it is still too early to assess if this new strain has become widespread, the history of newly emergent resistance in the bacterium suggests that it may spread rapidly unless new drugs and effective treatment programs are developed,” Unemo said in a statement.

Cephalosporin-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae joins vancomycin-resistant enterococci in a sinister class of bacteria known as superbugs. But unlike hospital-acquired MRSA and VRE, which spread where antibiotic use runs high and immune defenses run low, super gonorrhea could spread anywhere.

“This report points out that antibiotic resistance is occurring not only in hospitals, but out in the community,” said Dr. William Schaffner, chair of preventive medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn. And while the strain was disovered in Kyoto, Japan, antibiotic-resistant bacteria “don’t need a passport.”

Antibiotic resistance is not a new phenomenon — even for Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which developed resistance to several other antibiotics used before cephalosporins.

“We were concerned about this 20 years ago and combated that very effectively,” said Schaffner, explaining how gonorrhea treatments have evolved alongside the bacteria. “But if you have a strain that’s completely resistant to antibiotics, you have to very quickly develop strategies to recognize the resistant strain and alternative treatment regimens.” Such tests and new treatments could be developed, Schaffner said, but they would likely be more expensive. Amid cutbacks across all facets of research, pharmaceutical companies are investing less in the quest for new antibiotics, he said.

With an estimated 700,000 new cases each year in the U.S. alone, gonorrhea is one of the most common STDs.

It spreads through direct contact with the penis, vagina, mouth or anus, and can also be transmitted from mom to baby during delivery. But only 50 percent of infected women and less than five percent of infected men develop symptoms, such as a burning sensation and discharge. Left untreated, the infection can spread to the skin, blood and other organs causing pain, infertility and even death. A July 8, 2011, report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention urged doctors to be on the lookout for gonorrhea resistant to cephalosporins, and to report cases promptly.

The new superbug serves as a reminder that antibiotic resistance is a problem that spreads beyond hospital and nursing home walls. “We need to implement a program so that pharmaceutical companies are motivated financially to pursue research in developing antibiotics,” Schaffner said. “And both the public and professional have to be much more rigorous in their expectations and use of antibiotics.”

Safe sex? Young adults in the UK are the most likely to catch gonorrhea and account for half of new cases.

 Safe sex? Young adults in the UK are the most likely to catch gonorrhea and account for half of new cases.

Unstoppable Sex Disease

By Daily Mail Reporter

Last updated at 6:41 PM on 10th October 2011

A sexual disease that is resistant to all drugs has been discovered by scientists. They warn the strain of super-gonorrhoea could spread very quickly unless better treatments are developed.

Although only one case has been confirmed, experts fear many more may have gone unreported. Until now gonorrhoea has been very easy to treat with antibiotics called cephalosporins. Patients usually need only a single pill or jab. But Swedish scientists who have analysed the new strain found in Japan believe that over the decades the disease has mutated to become resistant to current treatments Magnus Unemo, of the Research Laboratory for Pathogenic Neisseria in Orebro, described it as an alarming discovery.

‘Since antibiotics became the standard treatment for gonorrhoea in the 1940s, this bacterium has shown a remarkable capacity to develop resistance mechanisms to all drugs introduced to control it,’ he said.

Infection: The gonococci bacteria that causes gonorrhea. A new strain of the STI has been discovered
Infection: The gonococci bacteria that causes gonorrhea. A new strain of the STI has been discovered.

‘While it is still too early to assess if this new strain has become widespread, the history of newly emergent resistance in the bacterium suggests that it may spread rapidly unless new drugs and effective treatment programs are developed.’  Dr David Livermore, of the Health Protection Agency, said that while antibiotics were still effective at treating gonorrhea there were signs of growing resistance to them.

‘Our lab tests show that the bacteria are becoming less sensitive to these cephalosporins, with a few treatment failures reported,’ he added. ‘This means that we are having to change the type of cephalosporin that is used and to increase the dosage. ‘The worry is that we will see gonorrhea becoming a much more difficult infection to treat over the next five years.

‘Prevention is better than cure, especially as cure becomes harder, and the most reliable way to protect against sexually transmitted infections – including resistant gonorrhea – is to use a condom with all new and casual partners.’

The new strain of the sexually transmitted disease called H041 – was found in Japan and leaves doctors with no other option than to try untested medicines to combat it. Left untreated it can cause infertility in women and men and can be life threatening if it spreads to the blood and joints. Some 16,700 Britons are infected with gonorrhea every year and it is one of the most common STIs after chlamydia.

The 16-24 age group accounts for almost half of all cases. Rebecca Findlay, from the Family Planning Association, urged wider use of contraception. ‘Prevention is better than cure, especially as cure becomes harder,’ she said. ‘Prevention becomes more important because we know antibiotics won’t always work. ‘Gonorrhea can affect people of all ages and everyone should be now focusing on looking after their sexual health.’

More…

Medical-Symbol-graphic-10135589_7864_ver1.0_320_240INFECTION TAKES MONTHS TO SHOW

One of the problems with gonorrhea is that its symptoms take time to become apparent. Around half of women and one in ten men will not be aware they have the disease for several months.

In women, the infection can spread to the womb and ovaries and increase the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease.

The very painful condition has been linked to infertility and ectopic pregnancy, wherein the foetus develops outside the womb and cannot survive.

Men can also develop infections in the testes and prostate gland which can reduce their fertility. Rates of sexually transmitted infections have increased over the past decade, although the number of cases has begun to level off. Experts have blamed increased promiscuity, particularly among the young.

Permanent link to this article: http://porninthevalley.com/2013/11/26/new-std-plague-worse-aids-just-hit-los-angeles-porn-super-gonorrhea/

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